Birds of Eden the largest free flight bird aviary in the world, Plettenberg Bay Garden Route Adventures South Africa
Birds of Eden the largest free flight bird aviary in the world, Plettenberg Bay Garden Route Adventures South Africa
Birds of Eden the largest free flight bird aviary in the world, Plettenberg Bay Garden Route Adventures South Africa
TAMHF is home to both primates (monkeys, lemurs and apes) and birds, who are unable to live natural lives because of the loss of a limb, an illness disability and/or psychological problem.
About our primates









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Glossary
F
Felidae

Felidae is the biological family of the cats; a member of this family is called a felid. Felids are the strictest carnivores of the thirteen terrestrial families in the order Carnivora, although the three families of marine mammals comprising the superfamily pinnipedia are as carnivorous as the felids. The most familiar felid is the domestic cat, which first became associated with humans about 10,000 years ago, but the family includes all other wild cats including the big cats.

Extant felids belong to one of two subfamilies: Pantherinae (which includes the tiger, the lion, the jaguar, and the leopard), and Felinae (which includes the cougar, the cheetah, the lynxes, the ocelot, and the domestic cat).

The first felids emerged during the Oligocene, about 25 million years ago. In prehistoric times, there was a third subfamily known as Machairodontinae, which included the "saber-toothed cats" such as the well known Smilodon. There were also other superficially cat-like mammals, such as the marsupial sabertooth Thylacosmilus or the Nimravidae, which are not included in Felidae despite superficial similarities.

Fynbos

The distinctive plant community found within the small (about 80,000 km²) Mediterranean-like heathlands of the Cape of South Africa. The fynbos contains over 7,700 plant species, of which about 70 percent are endemic – found nowhere else in the world. The soils are poor, so the fynbos does not support large animals, but many of the small animals are also endemic. One of the most fascinating families in the fynbos is the heath family (Ericaceae, such as blueberries or rhododendrons); there are over 600 heath species, whereas the rest of the world has only 26. Some of the fynbos species are located in extremely restricted ranges – some smaller than half a soccer field. Threats to the fynbos include development, fire and invasive species such as the acacia trees introduced from Australia.

Fungi

A group of organisms that are not plants or animals. Fungi live off of decaying organic matter, living plants and even animals. Many play an important role in the natural cycle as decomposers and return nutrients to the soil.

Fynbos

The distinctive plant community found within the small (about 80,000 km²) Mediterranean-like heathlands of the Cape of South Africa. The fynbos contains over 7,700 plant species, of which about 70 percent are endemic – found nowhere else in the world. The soils are poor, so the fynbos does not support large animals, but many of the small animals are also endemic. One of the most fascinating families in the fynbos is the heath family (Ericaceae, such as blueberries or rhododendrons); there are over 600 heath species, whereas the rest of the world has only 26. Some of the fynbos species are located in extremely restricted ranges – some smaller than half a soccer field. Threats to the fynbos include development, fire and invasive species such as the acacia trees introduced from Australia.

Folivore

also: folivory, folivorous animal that eats primarily leaves

Fragmentation

also: habitat fragmentation, forest fragmentation the process of breaking up blocks of forest into smaller areas by cutting roads, creating human settlements, or otherwise destroying a large enough tract of forest to permanently separate it from a once contiguous area

Facultative

contingent upon certain conditions; assuming a particular role or mode of life but not restricted to that role under all environmental conditions

Fauni-frugivore

animal that eats both animal and plant products

Female Philopatry

a social system in which females remain in the groups or home ranges in which they were born while males leave at sexual maturity; this means that a group of females is related it some way - sisters, mothers, aunts, or cousins and these females attract unrelated males

Foraging

also: forage to search for food

Fitness

a measure of the number of genes passed on to the next generation relative to other genetic contributions; individuals maximize their fitness by having as many offspring as possible that live to reproduce (and contribute their genes to the next generation)

Frugivore

also: frugivory, frugivorous animal that specializes in eating fruits

Fission-fusion Social Group

a social grouping pattern in which individuals form temporary small parties (also called subgroups) whose members belong to a larger community (or unit-group) of stable membership; there can be fluid movement between subgroups and unit-groups such that group composition and size changes frequently

Foramen Magnum

the opening at the base of the skull where the spinal cord attaches to the lowest part of the brain

Flagship Species

a popular, charismatic species that serves as a symbol and rallying point to stimulate conservation awareness and action

Factory Farm

A large-scale industrial site where animals raised for food are confined, usually indoors, and treated with pharmaceuticals to maximize growth and prevent disease. The animals lead short, painful lives; factory farms are also associated with various environmental hazards.

Foie Gas

To make this pricey gourmet delicacy, birds are force-fed enormous quantities of food three times daily via a pipe that is inserted into the esophagus. This leads to enlargement of the animal's liver and possible rupturing of the internal organs, infection and a painful death. The process typically lasts up to four weeks, until the birds are slaughtered.

Forced Molting

Process by which egg-laying hens are starved for up to 14 days, exposed to changing light patterns and given no water in order to shock their bodies into molting. It is common for 5-10% of hens to die during this process

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